P.S.

Local people, places, travels and simchas

Tucsonans march in D.C.

On Jan. 21, Tucson was represented among the half a million people at the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. Attendees marched in solidarity, supporting a spectrum of issues. Here is a sampling of their impressions:

Three generations in D.C. (L-R): Maya Millner, Eleanor Jeck, Hannah Millner and Rachael Jeck (Courtesy Eleanor Jeck)
Three generations in D.C. (L-R): Maya Millner, Eleanor Jeck, Hannah Millner and Rachael Jeck (Courtesy Eleanor Jeck)

Eleanor Jeck: “I traveled to Washington to join thousands of men and women in demonstrating our support for the principles of democracy and making clear our refusal to be repressed by the new administration. It was a thrill to join my daughter and granddaughters in supporting this cause. Despite massive crowds and close quarters, there were no complaints. It was a joy to participate in this peaceful protest, noting thoughtful signs of important issues and listening to chants of ‘This is what democracy looks like.”’

Three generations in D.C. (L-R): Mollie Hipp, Sylvia Hipp and Barbara Holtzman (Courtesy Barbara Holtzman)
Three generations in D.C. (L-R): Mollie Hipp, Sylvia Hipp and Barbara Holtzman
(Courtesy Barbara Holtzman)

Barbara Holtzman: “This march was an amazing experience enhanced by sharing it with one of my daughters and granddaughters.”

Allison Wexler: “Like our sisters who marched in 1913 to fight for my right to vote, and Dr. King and those who marched during the Civil Rights movement, I strongly believe in peaceful protest, civil disobedience, and standing up for what is right. We gathered, we marched, we chanted, we carried signs. I was surrounded by women I had never met before, but joined with them in our fight for justice.”

Dani Bregman: “I went to the march because I felt that it was important to make a statement about social justice, human rights, and the dignity and worth of every individual regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender, and physical and mental ability. With our current president, I feel that everything that was fought for, from women’s rights, civil rights, LGBTQ, and basic human rights are being threatened. We have come so far in our country’s short history and I do not want to see us go back. When people say, ‘Make America Great Again,’ it is as though nothing we fought for counts and that the history of oppression and racism never happened. I could not stand by and watch our country turn back the clock.”

Adena Bank Lees: “First, this march was for human rights across the board, not just for women and not just against one man. Second, the solidarity, peace and love that I experienced took me from helplessness and hopelessness to empowerment and hope that I can make a difference.”

Dinner and a movie

Tucson International Jewish Film Festival committee members Fay Green, Monique Steinberg and Deanna Mendelow with caterer Gwen Amar (second from right) arrange the Israeli buffet. (Sharon Klein)
Tucson International Jewish Film Festival committee members Fay Green, Monique Steinberg and Deanna Mendelow with caterer Gwen Amar (second from right) arrange the Israeli buffet. (Sharon Klein)

It’s a wrap. For 11 days, from Jan. 12–22, the 26th annual Tucson International Jewish Film Festival brought more than 20 Jewish films before more than 3,000 festival attendees. The TIJFF is one of the longest-running Jewish film festivals in the country and one of the longest-running film festivals in Arizona. This year’s hard-working committee was chaired by Steve Zupcic and co-chaired by Anne Lowe.

On Sunday, Jan. 22, closing night featured a multi-cultural Israeli buffet by Gwen Amar of L’chaim Kosher Catering. The delicious dinner was followed by a culinary travelogue, “In Search of Israeli Cuisine,” in which chef Michael Solomonov highlights chefs, home cooks, vintners and cheese makers, celebrating Israel’s culinary innovations and diversity.

The J’s outgoing director of arts and culture, Lynn Davis, said, “It’s been an enormous honor and tremendous amount of fun to direct the festival for these last six years. I have learned so much, been privileged to view and discuss amazing films and had the opportunity to work with terrific people. Film is such a rich way to convey ideas and experiences and a beautiful medium through which to portray Jewish life around the world.”

Tucson Senior Olympics

Pickleball player Rob Silver (Ronnie Silver)
Pickleball player Rob Silver (Ronnie Silver)

From Jan.7-Feb. 4, Tucson Parks and Recreation presented the 33rd Annual Tucson Senior Olympics Festival at venues around the city. The activities celebrated fitness, health, and an active lifestyle among adults 50 years of age and older.

Winter resident Rob Silver, 70, took part in the friendly pickleball competition. Pickleball is a racquet sport that combines elements of badminton, tennis and table tennis. A tennis player for many years, Rob started playing pickleball, finding it creates less stress on the body than tennis, especially on the shoulder and elbow. He currently plays at a 3.75 (out of 5) level and continuously strives to better his game by taking lessons and seeking out better players to challenge and/or instruct him. On Feb. 2, Rob played in his first tournament, competing with a partner at the Voyager RV Resort in the 3.5, ages 50-69, mixed doubles category. Although he qualified to play in the 70+ bracket, his partner wasn’t 70 yet, so he had to play with the younger seniors. They placed sixth out of 24 teams — Rob was satisfied but had hoped for a better ranking. This month, our competitor signed up for the Green Valley Senior Games in the 3.5, 70+, men’s doubles. He’s hoping that not having to play with the “kids” will make the competition a little more equitable.

Time to share

Keep me posted — 319-1112. L’shalom.

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